45 Master Characters

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Every novelist, screenwriter and oral storyteller faces the challenge of creating original and exciting characters. Archetypes provide a solid foundation upon which to fashion new and vastly different story people. 45 Master Characters explores the most common male and female archetypes, provides instructions for using them to create your own original characters, and gives examples of how other authors have brought such archetypes to life in novels, film and television.

* Worksheets are included to develop and map the lives of your own characters
* Excellent companion to the works of Joseph Campbell
* The first and only book focusing heavily on the heroine’s journey

 

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45 Master Characters: Mythic Models for Creating Original Characters by FW Media, Inc.

 

 

What Others Say About the Book

“I finally have a contract. Thanks to your great book 45 Master Characters and your classes. They helped me understand the characters so much that I began to understand myself.” Kenya R

“Writers of all experience levels will find “45 Master Characters” to be a very handy reference. The information within is so interesting you could easily read it from cover to cover. But it’s also broken up into easy to scan sections so you can find the personality traits you need to generate a realistic hero, heroine or supporting character.” FictionAddiction.net

“There’s a great section on supporting characters, for example. But best of all, roughly a full 95 pages of the book cover the feminine and masculine archetypal journeys. This is where things really take off and catch at the imagination. All in all, this book is interesting, useful, and well-detailed. If your characterizations could use a little help, this might be a fun place to start!”


 

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Getting Started:
What Are Archeypes, and Why Should Writers Use Them?
How to Use the Archetypes

Creating Female Heroes and Villains:
Aphrodite – The Seductive Muse and The Femme Fatale
Artemis – The Amazon and The Gorgon
Athena – The Father’s Daughter and the Backstabber
Demeter – The Nurturer and The Overcontrolling Mother
Hera – The Matriarch and the Scorned Woman
Hestia – The Mystic and the Betrayer
Isis – The Female Messiah and the Destroyer
Persephone – The Maiden and the Troubled Teen

Creating Male Heroes and Villains:
Appolo – The Businessman and the Traitor
Ares – The Protector and the Gladiator
Hades – The Recluse and the Warlock
Hermes – The Fool and the Derelict
Dionysus – The Woman’s Man and the Seducer
Osiris – The Male Messiah and the Punisher
Poseidon – The Artist and the Abuser
Zeus – The King and the Dictator

Creating Supporting Characters:
Introduction

Friends – Magi, Mentor, Best Friend, Lover
Rivals – Joker, Jester, Nemesis, Investigator, Pessimist, Psychic
Symbols – Shadow, Lost Soul, Double

The Feminine and Masculine Journeys:
Introduction – how men can go on the feminine journey and vise versa

Plotting the Feminine Journey
Act I: Containment
Act II: Transformation
Act III: Emergence

Plotting The Masculine Journey
Act I: Challenge
Act II: Obstacles
Act III: Transformation

Appendix:
The Feminine Journey Worksheet
The Masculine Journey Worksheet
Journey Differences
Societal/Gender Differences

 

“Ms. Schmidt discusses the difference between a stereotype and an archetype. She talks a bit about individualizing characters using aspects of appearance, what the characters care about and fear, motivations, how others see the character, and so on. When providing examples of each archetype she deliberately provides a wide spectrum of possibilities so that you can see some of the variations that are possible.

The archetypes are quite detailed. Each has both a positive and a negative side. The author includes all sorts of information about the archetypes, from things they tend to care about, to which other archetypes they pair well with, and what their assets and flaws tend to be. Then Ms. Schmidt does more in the list of examples to break the stereotype worry than she does anywhere else. She includes examples from TV, film, literature, and history, so no matter what your reading or viewing pleasure, you should find something you can relate to. Oddly, while the character archetypes are what sell the book, they turned out not to be the main attraction for me. There’s a great section on supporting characters, for example. But best of all, roughly a full 95 pages of the book cover the feminine and masculine archetypal journeys. This is where things really take off and catch at the imagination. All in all, this book is interesting, useful, and well-detailed. If your characterizations could use a little help, this might be a fun place to start!”

Reader Evelyn F.R. – “Story Structure Architect saved my career!!! I can not tell you enough how impressed I was with this book!!!! This book changed my life!! I was working on a few books at the time and I was feeling rather overwhelmed; my story was flopping in the middle, it just didn’t seem to be going aywhere! I basically gave up and didn’t plan to finish at all when I saw this book and thought, “Well, maybe this is the motivation I need.” After the first few pages I was on a roll!! I worked and worked into the wee hours of the morning and had my entire story, from start to finish, planned out in a very satisfactory manner!!! This book saved my writing career!! THANKS SO MUCH!!

FictionAddiction.NET
”Fleshing out your characters can often block you from moving your story forward. “45 Master Characters” uses mythical models who all carry character traits common in today’s fiction writing.Each section details mythical heroes and villains. After identifying personality assets and flaws, each hero and heroine is placed into TV, film, literary and historical examples of popular figures.For example, Apollo is called part businessman, part traitor. At the end of the chapter, Dr. Frasier Crane (Kelsey Grammer), Edward Lewis (Richard Gere) in Pretty Woman, Macon Leary in The Accidental Tourist and others are put into “real” character examples we can all understand. Even tips on how to develop such characters are included. An over-controlling mother may hurt others for her own good. A recluse may be afraid of his emotions. A seducer may become a stalker if rejected.In the back of the book, a brief feminine and masculine journey worksheet will help you develop deeper characters that matter to your readers.From Captain Spock to Alex P. Keaton, Cleopatra to Kelly Bundy, all of the genuine traits that make us all unique will have you breaking through characterization road blocks.
Writers of all experience levels will find “45 Master Characters” to be a very handy reference. The information within is so interesting you could easily read it from cover to cover. But it’s also broken up into easy to scan sections so you can find the personality traits you need to generate a realistic hero, heroine or supporting character.”